addarrow-downarrow-leftarrow-rightarrow-up82CF3E98-D323-4B3E-9EDD-EF2E73FB5C9E@1xcancelClose IcondowndownloademailIcons / Social / FacebookfilterhomeIcons / Social / InstagramleftIcons / Social / LinkedIn895A4639-EEE0-4BEB-B7D1-CAB21217861B@1xMenu IconremoverightSearchtagtik-toktranslateIcons / Social / TwitterupIcons / Social / YouTube

Blog

Blog articles

A smiling gentleman at the Dakwa Settlement near Abuja, Nigeria
3 reasons to believe we will end leprosy in the next 14 years

After thousands of years of the disease ruining lives, we are now on the edge of defeating leprosy. Here are three reasons we believe we can, with the right resources, end the transmission of leprosy by 2035.

A woman in an orange sari looks at the camera
Has Covid-19 changed our target of zero leprosy transmission by 2035?

Are we still on course to achieve our goal of zero transmission by 2035? In short, yes.

Two young children sit with their father in India
The silent suffering of a billion people: killing off leprosy’s best friend

We want to raise the voice of people affected by leprosy and other NTDs. Their plight could be avoided through the eradication of poverty.

A woman in a colourful headscarf smiles at the camera
A new tool that will help us defeat leprosy by 2035

We believe we can end the transmission of the disease by 2035 and one of the crucial new tools to help us achieve this is PEP (Post-Exposure Prophylaxis).

A red squirrel in the wild
Five things you didn’t know about leprosy transmission

Here are some of the more unusual things about the transmission of the disease.

A doctor takes notes during a consultation with a patient in Bangladesh
How is leprosy transmitted?

Understanding the transmission of leprosy will help us to combat transmission of the disease, as well as other problems associated with leprosy.

Contact tracing is crucial to stopping Covid-19 and leprosy

In recent months, we have heard plenty about how contact tracing is a key weapon in the fight to bring an end to the Covid-19 pandemic. The same is true for leprosy,.

Rita sits with Nursing Superintendent Mahima Bantawa
5 Things you didn’t know about leprosy

Leprosy is not what you think it is.

Mother and daughter in Nepal smile at the camera
Why I think we can defeat the world’s oldest disease in the next 15 years

Leprosy is the oldest disease in the world. Sadly, hundreds of thousands of people are still diagnosed with it ever year. We are now entering 2020 and I believe that, in the next 15 years, we will end transmission by 2035.